Psyching the Zietgeist:
Current Culture Through a Mental Health Lens


Increased Depression and Anxiety amongst Young Adults

The last few years, I’ve noticed an increase in young adults seeking therapy for anxiety and depression. These college students, as well as recent graduates newly in the work world, are overwhelmed by both internal pressure and external stresses. For many there’s an underlying paralyzing perfectionism–a need to excel to do the best and the most. Clients come in noting, among other symptoms, sleeplessness, difficulty concentrating, distorted body image and unhealthy eating, a sense of hopelessness, and crippling negative self-talk.

The 6/7/17 New York Times special section on Higher Education included pieces on how some universities are responding to their students’ mental and emotional health problems. These articles provide an overview of the complex issues and challenges students face, and detail strategies for responding to their struggles.

Colleges Get Proactive in Addressing Depression on Campus

A Climb Out of Depression, Doubt and Academic Failure

by Judy Koven, WTRS Coordinator

The On-Demand Culture and Therapy

We in Seattle live in a busy city, with its strong economy, burgeoning population, changing demographic, and the many challenges these bring. The corporate technology culture that’s become predominant in central Puget Sound exerts a powerful influence on our sensibility, values, and priorities. I call it the “on-demand culture”.

Want to buy something? Order it from Amazon Prime and it shows up in a few hours. Hungry? Find something that looks good on your restaurant app and a delivery person is at your door with an insulated bag, dinner at the ready. Need to get somewhere quickly? Get on your smart phone and Lyft will be there.

As someone who educates and matches clients looking for a therapist, I often see the ripple effect from this on-demand worldview. People now come to the search for a therapist with similar expectations, foregrounding convenience and immediate results. These are understandable requests but not necessarily realistic, nor are they reliable determinants for successful therapy.

Therapy entails a different mindset. Research has repeatedly shown that a good match in a therapist is essential for a positive outcome. When we’re in distress, it’s understandable that we want relief now, and it takes courage to reach out for assistance. But convenience doesn’t guarantee productive and successful therapist-client collaboration over time.

An on-demand culture may work efficiently for meeting practical needs but doesn’t translate well for our deeper well being. In fact, it is a significant source of stress. Therapy provides an opportunity to slow down, reflect, and create new ways of understanding and interacting with the self and the world. The result is deeper, more lasting transformation.

by Judy Koven, WTRS Coordinator